Spring 2014 South Asia Institute Colloquium Series

Monday, April 14, 2014

Annual Mary Keatinge Das Lecture
A talk by Muzaffar Alam
Maulana Azad and  the Memory of India's Islamic Past
Time:  4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location:Room 208, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont
 

Muzaffar Alam is George V. Bobrinskoy Professor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago.  An historian trained at Jamia Millia Islamia and Aligarh Muslim University, he earned his PhD at Jawaharlal Nehru University in history in 1977. Before joining the University of Chicago, he taught for three decades at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University.  Alam has held visiting positions in the Collège de France (Paris), Leiden University, University of Wisconsin (Madison), and the EHESS (Paris).  His recent publications include The Languages of Political Islam in India: c. 1200-1800 (2004); Indo-Persian Travels in the Age of Discovery: 1400-1800 (2010, with Sanjay Subrahmanyam); and Writing the Mughal World: Studies on Culture and Politics (2011, also with Subrahmanyam).

Monday, April 28, 2014

A talk by Gyanendra Pandey
A History of Prejudice:  Race, Caste, and Difference
in India and the United States
Time:  4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location:Room 208, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont
 
Co-Sponsored by the Institute for Research in African-American Studies
 
Gyanendra Pandey is Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of History and Director, Colonial and Postcolonial Studies Workshop at Emory Univeristy.  He earned his D.Phil. at Oxford University, and was a founding member of the Subaltern Studies collective.  Before moving to Emory, he taught for many years at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Kolkata; the University of Delhi; and the Johns Hopkins University.  Pandey has held visiting appointments  at institutions in Australia, India, Japan, the Netherlands, the UK and the US. His monographs include Routine Violence: Nations, Fragments, Histories (2006); The Construction of Communalism in Colonial North India (rev. ed. 2006); The Ascendancy of the Congress in Uttar Pradesh: Class, Community and Nation in Northern India, 1920-1940 (rev. ed. 2002); and Remembering Partition: Violence, Nationalism and History in India (2001).  His most recent publication compares African American and Dalit struggles: A History of Prejudice: Race, Caste and Difference in India and the USA (2013).
 

Monday, May 5, 2014

A talk by John Guy
Lost Kingdoms:  Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture
of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century
Time:  4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location:  Room 207, Knox Hall, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont
 
Introduction by Vidya Dehejia, Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian and South Asian Art, Department of Art History & Archaeology
 
John Guy is Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He previously served for 22 years as Curator of Indian Art and the Victoria & Albert Museum, and is an elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, London. He has worked on a number of archaeological excavations, at land and maritime sites, and served as an advisor to UNESCO on historical sites in Southeast Asia.  Guy has curated or co-curated a number of exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, most recently  Epic India: Scenes from the Ramayana (2010); Wonder of the Age": Master Painters of India, 1100--1900, (2012), and upcoming Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition, Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century (April 14 – July 27, 2014).